Model Building · Structures

That Corrugated Shed

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That corrugated shed next to the public delivery track in St. George.

Photos of Peterborough, NH, in the 1950s show a crude looking corrugated shed next to the station. In the book, The Boston & Maine, a Photographic Essay by Philip R. Hastings, the shed shows quite clearly on page 140-141. The same photo can be seen on page 59 of Model Railroad Planning 2000. Since little is known about it, it’s generally referred to as that corrugated shed. I’m guessing the shed belonged to the nearby building supply business. There could have been roofing, bricks, fencing, maybe bags of cement or bales of hay in there. Who knows?

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Peterborough 1950. Phillip R. Hastings photo.

Well, I just had to have an ugly shed like that in St. George. I love the angled loft.

With a couple of photos and an overhead shot of Peterborough, I sized the shed to be about 70′ long and 25′ wide. I thought a structure 40′ by 25′ would fit nicely in St. George.

I happened to have a passel of O scale corrugated strips from Builders in Scale. They must date back to the 1980s gotten in for some project long, long forgotten. They’re perfect for sheathing this building.

I started construction by making a mock-up in foam board. I don’t have a photo showing the front side of the shed. I’m assuming there was just a large sliding freight door on that side. From what I can tell, the other three sides of the shed are blank.

For this model, I used the mock-up as the actual guts of the structure so I took care to build it foursquare. An opening for the door was cut in the front wall section and the walls were assembled to basswood bracing with contact cement. The sliding freight door was scratch built from basswood. Trim boards are all basswood strips. This was a good point to paint the door and trim. I choose a dark green color.

Now for the corrugated siding. After a wash in 91% alcohol they were given a spotty coat of Model Masters gray primer from a rattle can to knock down most of the shiny galvanized finish. The sheets were cut into 4′ by 8′ panels and weathered individually with artists oil washes. I was going for some subtle variation in the base color of the panels along with a little rust and grime. The photos show a distinct difference between panels and I wanted to capture that effect. The panels were attached to the walls and roof with medium cyanoacrylate. Care was taken to overlap the panels properly. After a spray of Testors DullCoat, final weathering was done with artist’s oil washes and Pan Pastels.

I located the shed off of the public delivery track near the station with its back to the viewer. As work in the area goes on, I’ll surround the shed with lots of clutter like sewer pipes, pallets of bricks, scraps of lumber and whatever other junk I can come up with. There’ll be stacks of sawn lumber and spills of bagged material. An occasional box car or flat will be spotted nearby for unloading.

 

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4 thoughts on “That Corrugated Shed

  1. I have wonder what that metal shed was used for. That is one of my favorite railroad pictures of all. Hastings was a true artist with his camera.
    Excellent choice for your railroad.

    Gene

    Like

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